Episode Summary:

In this episode we are discussing the issues connected to communicating animal research. Open Science is based on making science more transparent and accessible, but what does that mean for those who do more controversial research? We will cover what fears scientists might have, and the arguments for and against animal research that scientists often hear. In Part 1, Luiza gives her perspective as a former lab scientist and Emma talks about her ideological change from animal rights activist to science communicator. 

Links:

Quotes:

'If one scientist feels they can talk about this a bit more then that's good, right?' 

Episode Summary:

In this episode we are discussing preprints and how they fit into Open Access publishing. Our interview guests will be Dr Manvendra Singh, a post-doc, and Elias Lowenstein, a PhD researcher, both from the Max Delbrück Center for Molecular Medicine in the Helmholtz Association (MDC). We will cover what pre-prints are, what possible benefits they bring, and how they can help promote open access more widely.

Resources and Links:

Episode Quotes:

“With preprints it is a copyright you have, to the world: you gave this information first”

Episode Summary:

The podcast this episode will report directly from an ‘Edit-a-thon’ that aims to celebrate International Women’s Day 2019 by improving diversity on Wikipedia pages. The podcast will investigate what the challenges to diversity in science are and how the Open Science movement can help.

Organising Institutions:

Max Delbrück Center for Molecular Medicine (MDC), Berlin Institute of Health (BIH), Charité Universitätsmedizin Berlin, and Leibniz Forschungsinstitut für Molekulare Pharmakologie (FMP)

Interviewees:

Dr Karin Höhne

Dr Jess Wade

Dr Alice White

Dr Wing Ying Chow (Ying)

Steph (Attendee and Science Communicator)

Links: 

How to Edit a Wikipedia Page - BBC Article

Wellcome Library

Inferior, Angela Saini (The book that inspired Jess Wade)

Reimagining Open Science Through a Feminist Lens

Quotes: 

'We have so many women doing incredible work so we just wanted to make them visible'

'Men's work is more likely to accepted and more likely to be cited'

'One of the things that excites me about Wikipedia is that it is a great gateway for people who might never have clicked on a journal article'

'Anything you can do in your pyjamas is a good thing'

 

 

February 28, 2019

Is science self-correcting?

Episode Summary:

In this episode we are discussing whether science is broken or whether it is self-correcting, and whether the Open Science movement is evidence that science does in fact self-correct. Our interview guest will be Daniel Engber who is a science journalist from Slate magazine. We will cover problems and challenges in the practice of science, what can be done to improve the situation, and how Open Science principles are helping to change things.

Resources and Links:

Episode Quotes:

“Science is only self-correcting if people take the trouble to correct it”

Episode Summary:

In this episode we are discussing Plan S. Plan S is a new approach to Open Science publishing; an initiative which would require researchers receiving funding from state and EU funding to publish fully open access. Our interview guest will be Professor Sabina Leonelli who is closely involved with researching and advising on Open Science issues, and who has co-authored a statement on Plan S from the Global Young Academy. We will cover what Plan S is, the potential positives and negatives of Plan S, and the difficulties in making changes to research structures.

Resources and Links:

Episode Quotes:

“Plan S is a rather radical way that funders are trying to push the publishing landscape”

Episode Summary:

In this episode we are discussing Unpaywall. Unpaywall is a database and browser extension that legally searches for Open Access versions of research papers. Our interview guest will be Heather Piwowar who co-developed and manages Unpaywall. We will cover how and why Unpaywall was developed, and the issues with current Open Science tools.

Resources and Links:

Episode Quotes:

“It is cool to see the green unlock icon, which if you click it takes you immediately to a free article, right beside a big box on a publisher’s page that says ‘$39 to view’. It feels like we are really unlocking the power of Open Access”.

February 7, 2019

Good scientists share data?

Episode Summary:

In this episode we are discussing data sharing and who owns research data. Our interview guest will be Dr Daniel Barron from Yale University, who wrote an article on these issues in Scientific American. We will cover the issue of what the priorities for research data are, the Jack Gallant controversy, and should Open Science principles be enforced.

Resources and Links:

Episode Quotes:

“Who owns research data?”

Episode Summary:

In this episode we are discussing researcher career options and how open science can have career benefits. Our interview guest will be Dr Janet Metcalfe who is the Head of Vitae, an organisation supporting researcher professional development. We will cover the challenges researchers face in modern academia, the surprising truth about changing career paths, and how Open Science can benefit research career progression. 

Resources and Links:

Episode Quotes:

“People, when they are doing their PhD, they tend to measure their PhD in terms of the research results at the end of it, but actually the most important product of a PhD is the person.”

A little taste of what to expect from the ORION Open Science podcast! 

The podcast is hosted by Luiza Bengtsson and Emma Harris from the Communications department at the Max-Delbrück-Center for Molecular Medicine in the Helmholtz Association (MDC). On behalf of the ORION project, Luiza and Emma have been developing a whole range of training resources about Open Science for researchers, including workshops and online materials. The podcast is intended to be an easy and entertaining way to learn more about Open Science and research.

Watch Now: