Episode Summary:

In this episode we are discussing data sharing and Open Science. Our interview guest will be Stanford University Professor of Medicine: John Ioannidis who has now come to the Berlin Institute of Health as an Einstein BIH Visiting Fellow at the BIH QUEST Center to establish the Meta-Research Innovation Center Berlin (METRIC-Berlin), the European “sister” of the Meta-Research Innovation Center at Stanford (METRICS). We will cover his research and opinions on data sharing, reproducibility, and how to improve research.

Links: 

John Ioannidis

BIH Quest Centre

Why Most Published Research Findings Are False

Quotes:

'I think that scientists, by themselves, are recognizing that it is important to share [data] and in many fields, like in Genetics, they realize that unless they share they cannot really go very far'

'Clearly over the years we have seen more scientific sharing of data'

Episode Summary:

In this week's episode, Open Science advocate and researcher Björn Brembs talks about his analysis of and radical solutions to the flaws he identifies in the scientific publishing system. Brembs discusses manipulated impact factors, pseudo-competitions, the evolution of the reproducibility crisis, and what we could all do instead! 

Links: 

Björn Brembs Blog

Björn Brembs Twitter

Article on pseudo-competitions in science (in German)

Quotes:

'People strive not to find the next interesting discovery, but to find the next paper'

'Our institutions need to realise that the journal system harms science'

'The publication services the journal system currently provides, when we do it ourselves would be about 10% of what we are currently paying'

Episode Summary:

Our guest Dr Christian Busse spoke to us about the Free Software Foundation Europe and the challenges and opportunities connected to Open and Free Software...and what the differences between those two things might be. Christian has very kindly supplied some notes for us to add this week.

Links:  

First, the main website of the "Public Money, Public Code" campaign is: https://publiccode.eu 

Second, the "Legal activities" section of the FSFE website, which includes further links for licensing questions, workshops and the Legal Network, can
be accessed via https://fsfe.org/activities/ftf/activities.en.html 

Finally, there is an position paper by the FSFE on Free Software in Horizon2020: https://fsfe.org/activities/ftf/activities.en.html 

Quotes:

'Free as in freedom and free as in beer'

Episode Summary:

In this episode we are discussing the relationship between science and being funny. Science communication relies on grabbing attention, making science relatable and exciting, and humanising scientists, we talked to Marc Abrahams founder and emcee of the Ig Nobel Prize and editor of Annals of Improbable Research about the role humour plays in this.

Resources and Links:

Episode Quotes:

‘If you spend five seconds really looking at it, there’s something funny about it, and that’s what makes it interesting, and once you're interested, if only for five seconds, now you’re paying attention’

 

‘All of us were looking at each other and thinking: at any moment now some ‘grown up’ person is going to stop us’

Episode Summary:

In this episode we are talking to Dr Guillaume Filion from the Center for Genomic Regulation (CRG), Barcelona about his decision to put his name on all his peer reviews, why he feels this makes him more accountable, and what choices researchers need to make about whether their values align with those who they will work with. 

Resources and Links:

Episode Quotes:

“I had the feeling I would do a better job as a reviewer, if I put my name on it, if I put my name on the line then it would force me not to do a bad job”

Episode Summary: 

In this episode we are discussing what metadata is, the obstacles to sharing research data, and how Open Science recommendations are being transformed into actions. Our interview guest will be Professor Eva Mendez from Universidad Carlos III in Madrid who is the Chair of the European Open Science Policy Platform.

Links:

Factsheets (Open Data and Data Management)

Professor Eva Mendez

Open Science Policy Platform

Quotes:

'Open doesn't necessarily mean FAIR'

Episode Summary:

In this episode we are discussing a range of topics relating to the good and bad of research practices with our interview guest Ivan Oransky the co-founder of Retraction Watch. We will discuss the issue of paper retractions, and their wider implications for research integrity, peer review, and science journalism. 

Links: 

Retraction Watch

Research Integrity Information

Article on Issues in Peer Review

Quotes: 

'I don't think it is great to cover single studies every week'

Episode Summary:

In this episode we interview Dr Aubrey De Grey, founder of the SENS Research Foundation which aims to develop a cure for aging! De Gray works outside mainstream science and we talked to him about his controversial theories, views on citizen science, and rewarding radical ideas in science.

Links: 

SENS Foundation

Would You Want to Live Forever? Video on Emilia Tikka's Speculative Art Piece (Turn on subtitles)

Quotes: 

"It took us 10 years to get our 1st publication”

"I'm not planning to die"

Episode Summary:

In Part 2 of the episode on communicating animal research we bring you excerpts from an EARA event at the MDC at which scientists and science communicators discussed their views on how and why animal research should be communicated more openly. 

Links: 

Factsheets

Full talks: Improving openness in animal research in Germany – watch the videos

Quotes: 

'Only if scientists openly discuss animal research we can reach our goal: a consensus that the majority of society can support. We need to defend the middle ground'

Episode Summary:

In this episode we are discussing the issues connected to communicating animal research. Open Science is based on making science more transparent and accessible, but what does that mean for those who do more controversial research? We will cover what fears scientists might have, and the arguments for and against animal research that scientists often hear. In Part 1, Luiza gives her perspective as a former lab scientist and Emma talks about her ideological change from animal rights activist to science communicator. 

Links:

Quotes:

'If one scientist feels they can talk about this a bit more then that's good, right?' 

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